m

j

THE HA1;DJ¥

OLLECTION OF CHURCH MUSIC;

.SELECTED AND ARRANGED

HAYDN, HANDEL,

WINTER, WEBER,

MENDELSSOHN, CHERUBIM,

^TOGETHER WITH MANY

FROM THE WORKS OF

' MOZART, BEETHOVEN,! PAER, ROSSINI, 8 AND OTHERS.

ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS.

NEW YORK, A. S. BA]

B. F. BAKER,

DIRECTOR OK MUSIC AT CHAKMKO STREET CHURCH,

Ii. H. SOITT1ARD

ORGANISX AT ESSEX STRi -CII.

PUBLISHED

5. BARNES & CO., CADY & BUB&ESS; PHILA1

BANGOR. WILLIAM LE-W1

PE]RCE.

AUK & CO.; PORTLAND, 'JUNE, SANDORN & CARTK

IV.

9

i

Divisioa

ion

*

i

THE HAYDHT

COLLECTION OF CHURCH MUSIC

SELECTED AND ARRANGED

HAYDN, HANDEL,

WINTER, WEBER,

MENDELSSOHN, CHERUBINI,

TOGETHER WITH MANY

5

FROM THE WORKS OF

MOZART, BEETHOVEN,

PAER, ROSSINI,

AND OTHERS.

ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS.

HAYDN

B. F. BAKER,

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC AT t'HASSISG STREET CHURCH,

Lu H. SOUTHARD,

ORGANIST AT ESSEX STREET CHURCH.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY CHARLES II. PEIRCE.

NEW YORK, A. S. BARNES & CO., CADY & BURGESS; PHILADELPHIA, THOMAS, COWPERTHWAITE & CO.; PORTLAND, MAINE, SANBORN & CARTER

BANGOR, WILLIAM LEWIS; HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, W. J. HAMMERSLEY.

1 850.

PREFACE.

The Editors of the Haydn Collection, in preparing this work for the press, have had three objects constantly in view ; first to present music of a very high order; second, to have the music as easy of execution as possible, provided always that true musical effect and excellence should never in any instance be sacrificed to mere facility; and third, to select music of a character that should harmonize well with the various hymns (some of them of great lyric beauty.) in use among Christians ol different denominations.

And although such a remark may savor of presumption, they cannot help, on reviewing the result of their labors, some feeling of self-congratulation ; some slight tinge of pride does in fact, mingle with the emotions under which they present "The Haydn Collection" to the Public, and they believe that to be a false modesty, which would prevent any author from sav- ing something about what he conceives to be the peculiar excellencies of his work, especially when that work puts forth claims of more than ordinary magnitude upon public favor, claims isting upon quite different grounds than those upon which patronage is most frequently demanded and accorded.

By far the greater portion or the music contained in the following pages, has been culled

with great c.^rc from the works of the classic authors; the Oratorios and Anthems of Handel

and the Oratorios, Masses, and Motetts of Haydn and Mozart, the sublime sacred compositions

rubilli have ill been studied with this end in view; the numerous and highly beautiful

I .hi Winter, an author but little known in this country, have also received

much attention from the editors, who have selected from them manv gems of exquisite beauty

•ill be found scattered among other compositions not less worthy of notice.

Now unprejudiced minds, whether music from such sources, music which

Das e3" miration and heightened the devotion of thousands of refined and cultivated

minds ! ' irs- music Which has stood the test of that stern old critic, Time is not

likely to be better, and more worthy of use in our churches, than meagre compositions of

persons of limited skill and small attainments

is ere itet in this work, than in any similar collection known to the editors ; we mean of course, the real variety, not the mere number of tunes or piece* but nt omotioms expressed by the music, from the brilliancy of Han- del, the sober gravity ot the choral, to the soothing Andantes of Mozart and Winter or the graceful tenderness of Haydn. '

grace Here

found the majestic sweetness of the Gregorian style, the energetic, nervous the melodic beauty and rhythmic regularity of Rossini,

manne

Bi ethoven, the imoothly-flowin

, the impassioned soni-

, v:""'*:",', ' "' "! Mendelssohn, the earnest joyousness

ol webei u I the tender melancholy ol Hummel and Schubert.

, '" "' Lntbems, Hymns for various occasions, and short pieceifor Voluntaries

!'er°re ' M ' \; '' '"• Haydn Collection " is believed to present features of unusual

I and usefalne I Many of the hymn-tunes have been so arranged that thev may be

appropriately performed as set-pieces or Hymns on manv occasions. The two anthems by

singers, but have in all cases treated the subjects with reference tomusical -ftC ,n ?u f,

amni,vareto„?Pear/'ar<1 "' pCrS°nS' iJ ls ^V ,hat *- %£&*?«&&& induce «d

amply compensate for, any amount of study and practice that may be" bestowed

1 he elementary portion has been re-written with the greatest care and enriched with ,„, many new Exercises; the attention of teachers in particular Is requesedt his £2 which differs materially from the course of elementary instruction foundTn most «",rks <>/.!» School / eXPen«°Ce °f the Seni°r Edlt0r' as mMic3 Buperintendent of th ^Boston t 1 ^ ^°ls-; convinced him some time since that the old system was not only defective but ln dV fhe"^an?SCOnirad'Ct0ry' and that man-v ofthe explanations and rules se rved o rlv't „vs- tifv the scholar and convey wrong impressions, where thev conveyed any at all * '

I his matter he attempted and with considerable success, to rectify in the'' Element-,™ Music Book." now in use in the Boston Grammar Schools, which system of elemental jZ struc ion was copied ,n « The Timbrel" published not long after ; but in the << Ha" 1, ,

ton, many improvements have been made, and this system is now firmlv believed to I e , , '" thorough, correct, cons.stent and easy of comprehension, than any ,o he found at the pr, sen"

The Editors are led to speak thus confidently of their work, from the fact that durinir the, compilation, from the very first, they attempted not to please a party or sec., to gratify tbi. or that prejudice or taste, but to produce a work which thev could conscientiously recommend to th| nr friends as one eminently calculated to fill the void felt and acknowledged by so , '

people of discrimination, and which shl at the same time gratify and refine the musical as ,

and excite and heighten the religion, reelings of those among whom it mighl be used

U ith these remarks the Editors place their hook before the Public, In. si,,,- and believino thai .he more and the longer the Haydn Collection is used, the more will its various excelled cies be felt and acknowledged. "*voueu

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850, by B. F. BAKER, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

6TEREOTYI'ED BY A. It. KIDDER, 7 CORXHII.L.

METRICAL INDEX.

L. M. Double.

Barlow. 44

Danville. 45

Harvanl(for 8 voices.)49

Leipsic. 4 7

Mount Moriah. 43

Oilcans 41

Pomfret. 40

Shaftesbury. 4(5

Sharon 42

L. M. 6 lines, or L.P.M.

Boscawen 58

Boxford 56

Chapel 143

Chester 54

Clarendon 52

Dresden 55

Keene 5 7

Middleborough 144

Milan 53

St. Helen 145

AVeston 142

L. M.

Ancester 86

Andover 87

Antigua 79

Armley (lor men's voi- ces) 206

Bath 81

Bavaria 62

Bennington 62

Bethlehem 84

Birmingham' 70

Boston 75

Braintree 77

Cadiz 59

Canton 73

Catholic Chant 68

Darmstadt 72

Dayton 79

Dudley 06

Gardner 81

Georgia 67

Grafton 77

Gregory 65

Hartford 80

Havre 85

Hermanstadt 59

Huntley 82

Ipswich 61

Lucerne (for men's

voices) 206

Malta 65

Maiden 68

Medfbrd 66

Missionary Chant 74

Montpelier 60

Mt, Holly No. 1 64

Mt. Holly No. 2 64

Nashua 75

Neponset 85

Nye 78

Offenbach 83

Oxford 70

Potsdam 63

Providence (major)- -76 Providence (minor) 76

Quiehee 71

Reading 69

Roxbury 67

Rutland 60

Sandwich 74

Sorrcntum 69

Springton 83

Strafford 84

Syria 72

Wurtemburgh 63

Ware 73

Wenharo 48

C. M. Double.

Ackron 89

Canterbury 90

Eliot 94

Groves 96

Hanover 93

Louisville 88

Melrose -95

Munich 91

1'awtucket 92

Sandusky 115

C. M. 6 lines.

Keller

•97

C. M.

Ading 109

Alton 116

Anton 119

Avon 112

Beaufort 117

Beverly 101

Bradford 123

Calista 1 24

Carlsrue 100

Charleston 106

Chelsea 112

Coburgh lo7

Comorn 123

( Cumberland 102

Detroit 105

Fryburgh(for men's

voices) 207

Gaeta 1 OS

Garland 114

Gloucester 1 03

Greenfield HI

Gridle\ 120

Goldau N>. 1 113

(loldau No. 2 113

Groton 106

Hadley 119

Hammersmith 100

Hard wick 102

Lendemar 125

Linedale 110

Lyme 108

Lynn 99

Man 124

Nantueket 110

Natick 101

Newbury 114

Orford 118

Pesth 121

Pesaro 108

Plainlleld 122

Putney 122

Riga(formen'svoices)20

Rupert (Major) 98

Rupert(Minor) 98

Saltzburgb 118

Seville 125

Southfield 107

St. Anthony 104

Thornton 103

Tyre Ill

Vesper 120

Walcott 104

Waterbury 121

Wiltshire 99

Woburn 109

S. M. Double.

Calderon 13

Cheshire 128

Dunrossness 195

Franconia 131

Kenil worth 129

Ogdensburtrh 126

S. M.

Amherst

Appia

Beethoven

Bovlston

Dixwell

Dunsinane

Enfield

Farmington >) Mandeville-

•132 ••13!

-132 ••139

-136

-33 7

•139

-138 ••127

Mornington 185

Norwich 135

Pastoral 138

Patterson 133

Rustan (for men's

voices) 207

Saco 130

Sargino 136

St. Francis 140

Templeton 140

Vandalia 134

Wirt 133

Wiscasset 1 30

Yendor 127

7s. Double.

Beulah 171

Castleton 168

Erie 184

Florence 165

Ryland 177

Annesley 171

Anonyma 175

Atkinson 166

Bath 170

Canselli IS 1

Como 178

Concord 1 64

Corinth 181

Danvers 169

Dolores 167

Glasglow 164

Hampden 167

Hansen 17 2

Kelly 181

Merrick 1 75

Mutabile 201

Nashville 170

Newton 178

Northampton 171

Xuremburg 182

Prayer 183

Tangier 182

Vining 172

Waldgrave 244

Wayland 166

Wellaad 179

7s, or 8s & 7s. Mt. Pleasant (Double) 180

Nolden 179

Worthing 183

7s, six lines. Charles Street •• --176 Winnisimmet 179

8s & 7s.

Consolation 18S

Dantena 192

Dartmouth 193

Elndorf 192

8s & 7s. Double.

Danforth 189

Drummond 186

Doani 191

Jalapa 19o

St. Luke 187

Vinedale 185

Bs, 7s & 4s. Calvary 197

Littleton, or 8s & 7s. 19s Shelden,or 8s & 7s. 20:;

Smvrna 205

Tande 1 200

Wicklow 200

Worcester 204

II. M.

Albany 1 56

Betton 163

Gaza 158

Genoa 157

Lancaster 160

Lebanon 162

Maverick 160

Brague 159

Rundlett 161

Siloam 158

Thompson 155

Weymouth 154

C. IL M.

Carlesque 226

St. John 226

s. 17 m.

Montgomery 234

L.l\ M.

Chapel 143

Middleborough -144

Sl. Helen •" 145

Weston 142

(See L. M. six lines.)

c.~p7 M.

Candia 148

Noel 151

Ogilvic 150

Rapture ■> 149

Wesley 146

Woodvillc 117

s.TTm.

Barnes 152

(billon 152

Milford 153

r m.

' anaan 221

1 lercford 141

Marion 211

8s. Double.

Cephalonia 210

Goshen 209

Jerusalem 300

INDEX.

8s, 6s & 5s. Willinjiford 239

8s & 4s. Double. Eantansette 234

i Is. (Peculiar.)

aingen i"-':t

Peace 196

8s, 6s & 4s. Thomas 198

8s, 3s & 6. Sebeth 223

8s & 9s. Rabel 233

8s. (Peculiar.) Maker 196

7s & 6s. Double.

A - i .ria 194

plin 301

Bomaine 299

7s & 6s.

St. Stephen* 202

St. Dun-tan (PecuL)199

7s & - Quincy 103

7s, 8s & 6. Palmer 229

7s & os. Sedley 238

6 s. Nalley (Double) Linton 202

6s, 8s & 4s. Wallingford 227

6s & 4s. Sudbury (Double.) 218

Hudson 208

Thamar 219

Seta ( Peculiar.) -208 ermark (Pecul.)225

6s & os. Friendship 291

5s & 10s, or 10s & 5s. Michigan 214

5s & 8s. Malacca 238

5s, 7s & 4. Brattleboro 220

5s & 6s.

Belgrade 224

Newcastle 228

9s & 8s. Bowery 213

10s.

Laneville 212

Monmouth 217

1 0s & lis.

Ascription 216

Frankfort 212

Sutton (or lis)- -224

10s, lls& 12s.

Magnificat 230

lis. Avoca 215

lis & 8s.

Mt Zion 222

Stamford 232

lis & 9s.

St Olive 235

12b.

Cumberland 236

7s & 8s. Peculiar. Alton 319

ANTHEMS AND HYMNS.

Awake, my soul, 243

As, every day 264

Blessed are the dead 251

Blessed be the Lord 320

Come ye that love the Lord, 323

Come, let us sing 333

Eternal Source (Thanksgiving,) 338

Glory be to the Father 336

Hear my prayer, 306

I heard a voice, 250

Lord of my salvation, 302

Lord, dismiss us 314

Now the shades of night, 268

Offerings and Prayers 253

O give thanks (Thanksgiving.) 255

O Lord, hear me, 309

Spread thro' the earth, 316

The Lord will comfort Zion, 287

Tho' the sinner, 269

Wake the theme of praise, 294

When gathering clouds 312

When thou comest, 272

When the last great day, 328

SENTENCES AND SHORT HECES.

Blossed is he 245

Hear our prayer, 240

Lord I have loved, . . 249

Let the words of my mouth, 241

O be joyful in the Lord 24 8

Praise ye the Lord, 342

The Lord is in his holy temple, 246

Collect, " O Lord we beseech thee." 343

We glorify thee 242

Heavenly Father, 322

Pilgrim on life's rugged way 176

Cease ye mourners, 188

There is a calm 196

God that madest earth and heaven, 221

Lift your glad voices 230

Father of mercies, 232

Flung to the heedless winds, 237

Lift not thou the wailing voice, 319

CHANTS.

Bcnedictus, 349

Bonum est confiteri, 352

Cantate Domino, 350

Deus misereatur 351

Jubilate Deo 352

Vcnite, exultemus Domino, 348

Venite Nos. 2 and 3 349

Gregorian toneB, 344, 345, 346, and 347

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

INTRODUCTION.

Sound is the effect produced on the mind, by the vibrations of the air coming in contact with, and acting upon the organ of hearing. Anything, therefore, that we can hear, which the mind takes cognizance of through the ear, is Sound.

There are two primary and distinct varieties of sound ; the one, resulting from uniform vibration, is called Tone ; the other kind, arising from irregular vibration, is called Noise. In studying the science of Music, we have to do only with Tone, and Noise receives none of our investigation.

The pitch, i. e., gravity or acutcncss of sounds caused by uniform vibration, may be readily and accurately determined ; while it is more difficult, if not absolutely impossible to ascertain the pitch of sounds whose vibrations are irreg- ular, and indeed, commonly speaking, noise has no pitch.

A knowledge of music consists in a perfect appreciation of the pitch, duration, accentuation and force of tones, and the characters used, to represent tones, their relative pitch, duration, &c. It is proper to regard pitch as of the highest importance, since it is the most indispensable characteristic of tone ; the next in importance is duration, then accentuation, and lastly the different degrees of force or prominence.

By Melody is understood the relative pitch of tones. Tones are said to be of higher or lower pitch, in proportion as they are the result of a greater or less number of vibrations in a second of time.

Thus let us suppose a tone caused by twelve vibrations in a second, which we will represent thus, oooooooooooo; now a tone of much higher pitch might be represented by double the number vibrations, thus ; o . o . o . o . o . o.o.o.o.o.o.o. &c. ; while one lower than the first tone would be like this, oooooo

A scale is a succession of eight tones occurring at certain fixed intervals from each other, and the last tone is called an octave from the first ; thus if we were to depict the vibrations of any tone in this manner, oooooooooooo; its octave would be represented thus, oooooooooooooooooooooooo.

Just twice the number of vibrations of which any one tone is the result, gives its Octave.

The relative pitch of tones, is represented on the Stake. The Staff consists of five parallel lines with the intermediate spaces, each one of which is called a Degree. These degrees are enumerated from the lowest upward.

THE STAFF.

5th line.

4th line.

3d line. - - 2d line. - - 1st line.

4th space. 3d space. 2d space. 1st spaca.

8th degree. - - '

6th degree.

4th degree.

2d degree.

9lh degree. 7th degree. 5th degree. 3d degree. 1st degree.

The Staff may be extended by adding short lines either above or below, as may be required, and these degrees are reckoned from the staff, thus,

First space above.

First line above - -

Fifth line

Fourth line

Third line

Second line

First line

First line below

Fourth space.

~ Third space.

Second space.

- First space. - - First space below.

The degrees of the staff are named after the first seven letters of the alphabet, whose arrangement is determined by a sign called a Clef, which takes its name

from the letters for which it stands, thus, ^T the G Clef shows the let-

ter G to be on the second line of the staff fe and the F clef .0;

shows tho letter F to be on the fourth ^ line of the staff.

The letters are reckoned from the Clef lines upward, in alphabetic order, and downward by the inversion of that order.

The arrangement of letters on the staff, with the two clefs, is as follows ;

_ -E-E-

-U— p

-B-

,— D-

,-F-

-A.-!

-C-

-€K~f~e:

—A-

-E-D~nr:

^-G-

*T^

6

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

The G indicated by =£: is called the clef G, to distinguish it from any other G, and likewise the V 'V indicated by ,~y \< called the clef F.

Tones differ in three ways, first in pitch, next in duration, and lastly in force. The characters nsed to represent tones, irrespective of pitch, or force, are called Notes. The notes are as follows ; this character G is used to indicate the longest tone, and is called a whole note ; a tone of half the duration of that in- dicated by the °, is represented by this character, ^ and a tone whose duration is only one fourth that of the longest one is indicated by a 9 or quarter note, and 60 throughout, as the eighth note, the sixteenth note, * and the thirty-second

note.

+ '

The relative duration of tones, and value of the notes may be clearly repre- sented thus.

A whole note is equal to ©

2 halves,

or,

or,

or,

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

4 quarters. I

8 eighths.

16 sixteenths.

32 thirty-seconds.

Now the pitch rf tones i- indicated by the position of the notes on the staff. Thus here are represented two tones of equal Length, but different pitch.

•Q 1 The duration of tones is indicated by the different kinds of

/k : p~ notes, thus here are repre ented tun tunes of the same pitch igf ' =f:- but different lengths, -g

)-<?-

£=

The manner of indicating the various degrees of force will be explained horeaftcr.

The difference of pitch between two tones is called an interval. The interval between two tones represented on adjoining degrees of the staff is called a second. Thus it is a second, from A to B, from F to G, or from E to F, but not from C to E, or from F to A. There are two kinds of seconds, the major second, and the minor second which is half the size of the major second. A succession of eight tones in regular order is called a scale, thus,

-G-

-&~

-&-

221

JZ2L

I^Z

\

It will be seen that the scale is composed of eight tones and seven seconds ; five of these seconds are major, and two minor. The tones of the scale are reckoned from the lowest upward, and in addition to the numeric names, a syllable is applied to each. The same syllable is applied to the first and last tones of the scale as they are also represented on the same letter.

Minor second. ' Major second.

EXAMPLE.

Eight

Seven. ••••

Do. ••Si.

O-

•Six.

Major second.

Major second. Minor second. Major second. Major second.

Five.

Four. ' Three.

•Two.*

•One.

La.

•Sol.

•Fa. •Mi.

Ho. Do.

The Teacher should require the pupils to sing the soale from the shore rep- resentation, until they have aquired a correct idea of the proportionate elevation of the tones.

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

8ing also the scale from these representations :

^3Zl

:^s>

Do, Re,

JSL

is?:

_i2_:

c?-?

I

Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, Do. Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si,

The scale may be represented an Octave higher, thus.

Do.

-G>-

^?-S2-

-£?-

S5

:^22i-^=:

Sii

Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, Do, Ke, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Si, Do. Do, Si, La, Sol. After the pupils can sing the scale upwards correctly, let them sing the de- scending series, thus :

<S

Do, Si, La, Sol, Fa, Mi, Re, Do. Do, Si, La, Sol, Fa, Mi, Re, Do.

The correct pronunciation of the syllables used in singing the scale is as follows : Do, pronounced Do as in dome. Re, pionounced Ra as in rate. Mi, pronounced Mee us in meek. Fa, pronounced fah as in father. Sol, pronounced Sole as in console. La, pronounced lah as in bar. Si, pronounced See as in seen.

Tho teacher should insist on a proper enunciation of these vowels ; for in- stance, Do should be simply do, and not do-oo-oo ; lie should be ra, and not ra- ee-oe. Tho utmost vigilance should be exercised with regard to these faults.

TIME.

Time is the duration of tones ; it also includes the intervals of silence which occur between tones.

The characters representing tones have already been explained ; those indi- cating silence are called Rests ; they are of corresponding value to the notes themselves, thus :

Whole note. C /^ ■■»— Whole rest.

Half note. J AT —- Half rest.

Quarter note. I r* Quarter rest

Eighth note. *i Eighth rest.

Sixteenth note. 0 *> Sixteenth rest.

I** *i

Thirty-second note. * *i 32nd rest

*i

* I

Sixty-fourth note, » 53 64th rest.

V I

The value of notes and rests may be increased one half their original length, by placing a dot after them, thus ;

A dotted whole note, &KI^ZZ is equal to three halves. . o <2? £3

A " half "

A " quarter "

A " eighth "

A " sixteenth "

quarters. . . J

c »

eighths... J* J* 4

N S N " sixteenth. -^ d d

IS > S " thirty-seconds. ^n^S^S

8

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

'-, is equal to three half-rests. -*■- Jm-

A dotted whole rest. A " half "

A " (juarter "

and so on.

Whenever two dots are annexed to a note or rest, the second dot adds one half the value of the first, thus :

A double dotted whole rest -m- _ is equal to -,,- jo. P

" quarter rests, f* f* j" " eighth rests. ^ ^ *)

A A

" note half rest

" note

«s> a 0

&• . " " "

The perpendicular line attached to notes may extend either upward or downward, without changing their value, thus, J means exactly what (O does, and nothing different, and J^

]mmimm

♦—

are equal to |* fJ, and

0 0 0

RHYTHM.

divided into rhythmical divisions, called measures, which are sepa-

firom each other by a perpendicular line across the stuff, called a bar.

I tingui hi I and derives its name, from the number of parts

rhich i< i- divided; t)m.~ : a measure consisting of two parts, is called

double measure ; that of three parts, triple measure ; one having four parts is

fjuuilruple measure ; that of >ix parts, sextuple measure

Bar.

Bar.

=1

C*-o—& -& -j-^i— *

i^^pe

Measure. Measure. Bar.

The figures on the staff immediately after the clef, indicate the number of parts in the measure, and the kind of note with which each part is represented. The lower figure shows what kind of note, whether whole note, half note, or quarter note, fills each part of the measure, and the figure 1 stands for a whole note, the figure 2 for a half note, the figure 4 for a quarter note, the figure 8 for an eighth note. In the above example each measure consists of two parts, and each part contains the value of a half note, and there arc two half notes Or their equivalent in each measure. This subject cannot be advantageously pur- sued without the aid of practically marking the time by certain motions of the hand, corresponding to the different parts of the measure, whereby the length of tonos can be accurately determined. Great care should be exercised in teach- ing the pupils to acquire the habit of marking the time with the hand alone, while the fore-arm remains motionless. The hand should not be suffered to lin- ger from point to point, but should change its position instantly, at equal inter- vals of time.

Double measure may be illustrated by a word of two syllables accented on the first, thus :

Glo - ry. One, I tiro. Loud, Soft. Down, Up.

< '• I

i in.',

Lollll,

l>"« 11,

ly.

T wo. Soft. Up.

Numeral- descriptive i I the parts or the measure. The accentuation.

The motions of the hand.

Triple the first.

measure may be illustrated by a word of three syllables, accented on

Glo -

One,

Load,

Down,

Quadruple measure may bo illustrated by a word of four syllables, accented on the first and third.

ri -

OUS.

Jus

- ti - fv.

Two,

TBree.

One,

Two, Tin", o

Soft,

Softer.

Loud,

N •! ' . '

Left,

' P

Down,

Left, Up.

Con - gn One, Two Loud, Soft, Down, Left,

- gu - bed.

Three, Kmir i Loud, Softoi

Right, Up.

Man - i - fes ted.

One, Two, 'three, Four. I.on.i, Soft, I ess Load, Softer. Down, Left, Right, Up,

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

9

In like manner sextuple measure may be represented by a word of six sylla- bles, accented on the first and fourth.

Spir - it - u - al - i - ty. One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six. Loud, Soft, Softer, Less loud, Softer, Suftc-t. Down, Down, Left, Right, Up, Up.

In - stru - men

One, Two, Three,

Loud, Soft, Softer,

Down, Down, Left,

- tal - i - ty.

Four, Five, Six.

Less Loud, Softer, Softest.

Right, Up, Up.

Each kind of measure may be written with halves, quarters, or eighths, but the ordinary representations arc as follows,

)~-ja i iii ~i i I" an(* somet'mcs> though more rarely.

-3^::*:p:*:*:j

and

__ ^~^~^ ^~,

It is customary with some writers to designate by theletter C, with a bar drawn across it, thus :

I

and

-4-

thus, E3~ Vil

I

by the C without the bar,

It must be understood that the length of notes is relative and not absolute, so that a piece of music written in ~Q «Y~ ~|~ is not necessarily

to be sung slower than one writ - ^5"rv f^ X

8

I ZC the time

zwzwzw

" _ "I" is r

in

of performance being indicated in a manner, which, will be explained hereafter.

The following exercises show the union of Melody, Time and Ehythm ; they should be sung by syllables, letters, and numerals, and the pupils should be directed to look at the notes they arc to sing, in order to acquire facility in reading music. The habit of singing the scale from recollection is disadvantage- ous in primary education in music, as it tends to form a habit of singing by rote.

EXERCISE 1

i X__i_-_j±_^-3_«_jLj

-&-&^-&~G>-

EXERCISE 2.

iHPE

3-nTj jl^jUJfe

iin^l^ppp

If one tone be represented on each part of the measure, the measure is said to be in its primary form ; but if several parts are united in one tone, the measure is said to be a united form, thus :

m

primary form of 2-2 measure.

united form of the measure.

i

[2]

primary form of 2-4 measure.

S

united form of the measure.

10

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

EXERCISE 3.

HS1

§3=

-o- -&-

~sr

-e> &-

'^~

-G» G-

-G> G

~&—Zz:

:g-rs*— st

1IS?ZZ£?ZI

-s>— S*

I

-€?-

EXERCISE 4.

fe

rnn

* *-

"S3"

Primary form of 3-2 measnrc. First fonn.

=t=*

:*=*:

-G>-

Z^ZZWZ

-&-

9 m -G>-

IZ^E.ffiZI TZf ?5

I

^

Second form.

Primary form of 3-4 measure. First fonn. Second form.

J?=nT^rtzBI

EXERCISE 5.

<?^> s

£=

:=0=±

EXERCISE

-0-0-9- W W m

^t=t±t=t=t=±=^lttl=0=

* * 4

0-0-0

=t

# # #

EXERCISE 7.

-Z-J^j /~V- C> O -^ ■"

~<5> ^

&—&-

O © £3

iz: i£2r£2

0-0-0-

™ip

.-:

o

EXERCISE 8

isn^mupE

x_^_-;T^b:#_#

c

3=»

~0^-0zz0z~ ~& •-- -^P— P

H h

^z^c:-^

fri—t=t

:*=:*r*

" o

IP

EXERCISE 9.

-e?-'

^P#P^^^

\-

P3=

^S^^fl

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

11

If commencing on the first part, the union is said to be of the first class ; if on the second, the second class ; thus :

PRIMARY FORM.

First class. Second class.

First united form.

3E

Q r? zzz^ztzgizzz^z

I

1221

>2_

-(=-

I

Second united form.

_^:

1

I

EXERCISE 10.

±:*zzs£

-c-

-4- J I:

-<s?-

"P i* -r-

^~~? ^

£

l^tJSt

3

0-&

^zd:

La:

q-t^:

«:

:*=*:

-0-0-0-

£=t

izz*

'-•-0-0--W-

When the union commences on the third part of the measure, the derivative form is of the third class.

PRIMARY FORM OF 4-2 MEASURE.

f2L=f^

&—&-

-r? r?—p2—. ja-

zz:

e

:^zz^2-

g

First class.

Second class.

Third elas6.

z^kzzz^rzzzzgLZigz: nsr ,. rszzzzzg -Uz-r±z

EEE

i

Sl^1

*=P=

~

fflzsa

^=PZZfr

First class.

Second class.

?z2:

rae

?=lz

=P2:

_^2:

ztzzzzzzz

I

Third derivative.

fc2

fczlfril

I

EXERCISE 11.

z=i=ii u_i|=z=jfzz^: 3^-<sL -3

~&^&-&-&- *T&~&

-^r^=t=f

^^x: :szz i?Z3Z?23ZL

t=

&-&-&-

&-■&

4

±Z5ZZ±^222

*-*-#-^

o-

:=!=»

EXERCISE 12.

at^zi

-O-0-&-

*z*zpzp:

«=t=

.ffi_IZ^Z^

HUPS

i^^^^zzizzzt^_rr

12

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

PRIMARY FORM.

class.

I

Second class.

$=

-£T-

I

Fist class.

Second class.

EXERCISE 13.

z*z=*=*=22:

<0'

EXERCISE 14,

=t=±

=E

-s*-*-

-o-

I'

EXERCISE 15.

=£:

:fc=

-#- •-

:fcr*=jfc

*=

n=

000

~-

■4-4-4-

-*—*■

o-

Sinoe two or more tunes may be represented on each part of the measure, it is deemed convenient to give such measures or parts of measures a distinctive oame, indicative of the number of tones that may be represented. Tims if one note represent each part, the measure is Baid to be in its single or primary form ; if two notes of equal length, its double form ; if three, the triple form ; and tt four, the quadruple form, &c.

-4— E-

it

The value of three equal notes is reduced to that of two of the same de- nomination, by placing a figure 3 over them. Each suoh group of notes is called a Triplet ; three halves, when made a Triplet, thus : ^ £ ^ are equal

in value only to ^> ^ and * « 0 are equal in value only to ' 'and of every kind of note. ' ' '

The tamo may also bo said of rests.

PRINCIPLES OF MUSICAL NOTATION.

13

SINGLE FORM.

DOUBLE FOHM.

TRIPLE FORM.

QUADRUPLE FORM.

#=3=

:pzzzz*zzzz*:

X. I E

I

z*z=jtzzp:

t:

*

t

i

:* # azzpz:

1 1 1 I-

ES:

=P

Z=WZZZW=T-

zz^zz^zzp:

3-

iffzz^:

:t=

H

:*=*:

Bzszz: issizz

3

3

+

:z*zzpz=pzzpz^z: pzz«z^z:«zj:z^zz*zz*zzpzpzzp:

ll

I

z»zz*zz«zzpz*zz^

jizlL^^_^^zgz^z^zir^zazD^MM>-|

zzfz*zz*=*=pdf

h^ztzzzzzzzjzzzzrzt

3-

3-

•3—

=t=^:

izpzzzpzpzfz*

:zz[zz]=zzz:Lzizztztz^zizzuziz^zl-i^zliai^

zlz*z*z*:

3 zj^rr:

?z*z»_^_#_*z*z*z*z* :«:*q

1

-r 3-